Handling rejection

The other day I researched, wrote up and submitted a short biographical article to Wikipedia. It was about Dorothy Darnell, the founder of The Jane Austen Society, among other things. My submission was rejected.

That’s all perfectly fine. The reasons were valid and I feel it proves how rigorous the Wikipedia system of review can be.

One major reason for rejection was that she just wasn’t notable enough. That’s a bit sad for poor Dorothy. So, in order to give her at least a small bit of recognition, I’ve included my submission in this post.

For clarity I’ve removed the citations but include a short bibliography at the bottom. And, I have to admit, because I wrote it for Wikipedia, it’s not in my usual chaotic style.

Dorothy Gwynnyd Darnell

Dorothy Gwynnyd Darnell was born in Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland on 21 April 1876. She was the daughter of the Reverend Daniel Charles West Darnell (1841-1903), Vicar of Portsmouth from 1899 until his death from typhoid and pneumonia in 1903 and Elizabeth Darnell (nee Fisher) (1844-1927).

She studied art under Sir William Nicholson and exhibited at the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1904 (Daphne), 1906 (Sweet and Twenty), 1907 (“Much study is a weariness of the flesh“), 1908 (“Oh, mirror, mirror, on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?” Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs), 1910 (“Poor and content is rich, and rich enough“), 1912 (A maid of Antwerp) and 1914 (Lysbett).

Her career as an artist was from 1904-1922. She lived at 25 Campden House Road, Kensington, London, during this time. She specialised in portrait painting, her most notable being one of English musician, Emily Daymond painted before 1922.

Image from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Daymond

Sometime before 1939, Dorothy Darnell moved to Alton, Hampshire where she lived with her sister, Amy Beatrix Darnell (1873-1970).

Dorothy Darnell was the inspiration behind the creation of the Jane Austen Society which she founded in 1940. The main purpose behind the creation of the society was in order to purchase Chawton Cottage, the house where Jane Austen lived from 1809-1817. Dorothy Darnell served as secretary of the society, a role shared with the novelist Elizabeth Jenkins. Her sister, Amy Beatrix Darnell served as the Treasurer of the society.

Dorothy died at home, at Brook Cottage, Lenten Street, Alton on 12 October 1953.

Dorothy somewhat overshadowed by the Patriachy

BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • “1939 England and Wales Register for Dorothy G Darnell”.
  • “History In Portsmouth”. historyinportsmouth.co.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “A History of Lomond Park : 1905 – 2005” (PDF).
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1904. The 136th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1906. The 138th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1907. The 139th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1908. The 140th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1910. The 142nd. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1912. The 144th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “The exhibition of the Royal Academy, 1914. The 146th. | Exhibition Catalogues | RA Collection | Royal Academy of Arts”. www.royalacademy.org.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • “Emily Daymond (1866–1949) | Art UK”. artuk.org. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  • Society, Jane Austen (1967). Collected reports of the Jane Austen Society, 1949-1965. Dawson.
  • “England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995”. www.ancestry.co.uk. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
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